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Dog Bite News: Edwin McCains Son Bitten By Rottweiler: Greenville Dog Whisperers thoughts

I wanted to take a moment to comment on dog bites in the news. Since singer Edwin McCains son was recently bitten in the face by a Rottweiler at a local YMCA sporting event, what better time to address this.

First off, I want to take a moment to offer my most sincere, heart felt “get well soon” to Watt McCain. From my family here at Camp Dog Trouble to the McCain family, we wish you all a fast recovery and will keep you in our prayers.

I would also like to offer the McCain family an open invitation, especially Watt, to come meet a small pack of well behaved dogs… including a calm submissive Rottweiler who was raised around children. It is important for a dog bite victim to move past one badly behaved dog. It is also important for children to learn HOW to behave around dogs as well, so I would be honored to teach the McCain family how to understand more about dog psychology and how to be around strange dogs. My offer is open… Edwin feel free to call me personally at 864-248-6472.

I got a frantic voicemail one day from a man who said his 80 pound dog has bitten his small child in the face. So I explained that I consider this a “red zone” case with emergency priority. Days later at his home, I observe some things that are slightly out of balance, nothing hugely wrong. After pointing out the real issues in pack leadership and teaching them about setting boundaries and handling the excitable behavior, we finished the consultation.

A few weeks later at our follow up appointment, the family is in from out of town visiting… yet the excitable big dog is just calmly hanging back. I like what I see! The young child is at the dinner table and I notice a tape box on the floor around the childs high chair. During feeding the dog approaches the child and the child points and says “shhhhht”… the dog bows in respect and turns away as he should. I am so impressed!

The child who was attacked once was now one of the youngest dog whisperers on the planet! At two years old (I think) I saw a young pack leader who will forever have the knowledge of how to be around a dog. Think about that small child earning the respect of that 80 pound dog to that degree.

This brings us to responsibility. Plain and simple… Your dogs behavior is YOUR responsibility. There are always signs of this type of dangerous behavior before these tragic events happen. If people would swallow their pride and get the proper help from a proven dog behaviorist early on… these things would not happen.

A trained dog is not the same as a well behaved dog. Without your dogs trust and respect as his or her pack leader, all the training in the world will not prevent this type of attack. In fact if you call most dog trainers and say “my dog bit a kids face”… they will tell you to put the dog down. My clients story above proves them wrong.

Let me say that again… There is never a need for this type of thing to happen. It is the owners fault that they were not in the moment enough to see the early warning signs and correct them at the very second the focus was to high. You can ALWAYS see it… IF you are paying attention. What’s more… YOU are often the cause of the attack. You have to be your dogs pack leader 110% of the time and set the rules and boundaries. You also have to be IN THE MOMENT and paying attention to your pack at all times as a good pack leader should.  That applies to all dogs big or small!

I am open to accept this Rottweiler as a client for rehabilitation should the owner, Kennith Shaw the want help. If the judge allow this dog to live it desperately needs rehabilitation by someone who has had success helping many “dangerous dogs” recover. They are free to contact me… as are any readers who may be having behavior issues and seeing the early warning signs. I am absolutely 100% certain that I can rehabilitate this dog, there is no reason to euthanize this animal!

When you see your dog is staring too intently at something… or with too much focus you must correct him. When you see your dog is getting too excitable or going into inappropriate “prey drive” around young children running around… you have to correct the behavior. At the highest level the eyes will change and almost “bug out” in a very unnerving way.

The news, along with the McCains and their lawyer are focusing on banning dogs at childrens events. I can think of no more cruel thing than to change a policy and prevent a child from his beloved canine friend being a part of his life.

We need to focus on raising awareness that dog owners need to learn more about their dogs psychology and pack leadership needs. Dogs need three primary things in this order.

1) Plenty of exercise

2) Discipline (meaning rules and boundaries)

3) Affection comes last

Today in America the “dog lovers” love and pamper their dogs as if they were humans first. They are not humans… Dog must have a pack leader and rules to follow all of the time.

It is my hope that Edwin would consider helping me raise awareness about the pack leadership and exercise needs of our dogs. That is the only TRUE way to help prevent more of these types of needless injuries. Had this dog had a brisk “leadership walk” for a half hour or so before this game,  this event likely would not have occurred. Tired dogs are not as excitable and get in less trouble, but they still need rules and the owners attention at all times.

No laws banning any breed will ever help this problem. No policies banning dogs from their families sporting events will help. Only taking responsibility, leading our dogs and meeting their needs will reduce the numbers of children who are injured by dogs. If the dog bite doesn’t occur at a sporting event it will be elsewhere.. a park… downtown… at the family picnic… You get the idea.

Laws or policy changes will only shift where the injuries occur, they will never deal with the real problem. Educating “dog lovers” so that they can be EDUCATED dog lovers who fulfill their dogs primal needs is where the awareness needs to be focused.

~Jason Miller

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